Binge Watching

"Television executives should give audiences what they want, when they want it. If they want to binge then we should let them binge"

Kevin Spacey in House of Cards is (not surprisingly) an advocate of binge-watching, binge-viewing or marathon-viewing. The addiction peaked when our favourite series and movies were offered to us on-demand - thanks Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime. In a survey conducted by Netflix in February 2014, 73% of people define binge-watching as "watching between 2-6 episodes of the same TV show in one sitting". Given the rise of this cultural phenomenon, we thought it would be a good idea to find out 5 new things about it... and pick our favourite Binge Watchers' tweets too.

 

Binge Watching

 

"From Arrested Development to Dr. Who, Binge Watching Is Changing Our Culture" by Grant McCracken

In less than 140 characters: 

Who's with me??  

Key points:

Binge-watching gives us a sense of security, creature comfort, to make the world go away. Simultaneously, it creates a NEW world, a shared cultural space. It is a place of commonality and the duty to continue the story together with other binge watchers. An "in-group" is formed (""), and those who don't follow the series are excluded from the group ("Who the heck is Jon snow?")

Full story:

Click here to read the full story on INCEND.

 

Binge Watching

 

"Binge-Watch 'House of Cards' on Valentine's Day at Your Own Risk" by Keith Wagstaff & John Black

In less than 140 characters: 

Moderate Binge Watching is an oxymoron - but it's the only way to keep it healthy. 

Key points:

Excessive consumption gets the binge-watcher dull to the series, meaning the fun per episode will slowly decrease. This increased tolerance leads to a further addiction, a.k.a more time spent in from of the screen. When out of control, binge watching will have health impact. “There’s convincing evidence in adults that the more television people watch, the more likely they are to gain weight or become overweight or obese” says Lilian Cheung, a lecturer at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Full story:

Click here to read the full story on INCEND.

 

Binge Watching

"Your Binge-Watching Is Making the Planet Warmer" by Klint Finley

In less than 140 characters:

Binge Watching ain't good for your health. Binge Watching ain't good for Planet Earth's health.

Key points:

76% of expected internet traffic in 2018 will come from videos. Amazon, which hosts Netflix’s streaming service, has pledged to go green - but will that be enough? Data centers are expected to account for about 21% of all electrical use, mostly because of the explosive demand for streaming video.

Full story:

Click here to read the full story on INCEND.

 

"Amazon Finally Tries Out the ‘Netflix for Books’ Craze" by Issie Lapowsky

In less than 140 characters:

Non-stop music? Spotify. Non-stop TV shows and movies? Netflix or Hulu. Non-stop books?

Key points:

Amazon is working on a subscription ebook service called Kindle Unlimited, which would offer unlimited ebook rentals for $9.99 a month. The publishing industry greatly innovated with the e-reader. Now, it is about to undergo another radical transformation. Who is next?

Full story:

Click here to read the full story on INCEND.

Binge Watching

 

"Why Netflix Wants to Keep Binge-Watching All to Itself" by Marcus Wohlsen

In less than 140 characters:

No Binge-Watcher would say "no" to watching a full season at once. That's why Netflix is working on it.    

Key points:

Netflix is working on a strategy of releasing entire seasons of its own shows at once. Networks could put every episode online at once, too, instead of piecing them out one week at a time. The reasons they don’t aren’t technological. As usual, it’s all about business.

Full story:

Click here to read the full story on INCEND.

 Binge Watching

 

***

 

Keep up to date through our social media channels:


Why this is awesome: 
Binge watching is a phenomena that should not be underestimated. It affects culture, business, health and so much more.